Autism & hockey, hockey & autism

I can no doubt count on one hand, make that one finger,  the number of times I’ve written about autism and hockey. So here’s number two.

The article is a great article about a hockey player, his wife and their two son’s, one of which is autistic. The article is entitled “With a special needs child to raise, a nomadic hockey life has been tough on Jason Labarbera and his family” by Jason Buckland over at Hockey News.

I even sent it to my brother, whose son plays hockey for the Waterloo Black Hawks and is heading to the University of Denver next year. Go Pioneers!

Sincerely-

  

Autism Librarian

So now what?

So now that I’ve been to the “Beyond Guardianship: Supported Decision-Making by Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities” workshop by Jonathan Martini, what do I do with what I’ve learned?

Well, the first thing I did was e-mail my son’s Special School District or SSD person at school and while I did get some of the answers I was looking for, I also feel like I have more questions to ask. I feel like I have a better idea of what I want his future to look like.

While I’m happy with what he’s accomplished, I feel like there is so much more he can do. It feels good to have knowledge which in turn gives you power. Now I just need to keep doing what I’m doing.

Sincerely-

  

Autism Librarian

Missouri AAIDD

Today I went to a really great presentation by the Missouri chapter of American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and I while I had doubts before going, I’m so glad I went. I went to a workshop on Guardianship put on by St. Louis Arc and at the time, I was very unsure of what to do.

The presentation, entitled “Beyond Guardianship: Supported Decision-Making by Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities” by Jonathan Martinis was well worth it. For me, I’m definitely feeling better of which direction to go. If you get a chance to hear him speak, I highly recommend it.

Sincerely-

  

Steve

Medicaid

I will be the first to admit that I know little about Medicaid but I will also say that it’s something I need to learn more about, especially as I research resources for my son and retirement for myself.

That said, I definitely learned something from this article, “Connecticut Moves Away From Private Insurers to Administer Medicaid Program” by Melinda Beck and over at the Wall Street Journal but, unfortunately the link above won’t work unless you have a subscription. It is however, worth the read, so you might go check it out at your local library.

Sincerely-

  

Autism Librarian

Sensory friendly films

Last weekend the kids and I went to see Eddie the Eagle at the movie theater, on opening day no less. We haven’t been to a theater to see a movie in probably a few years, so the sticker shock was a bit of a surprise but I also learned that my daughter actually liked going to what are called sensory friendly films for the same reasons we went for my son.

The lights are on, there are no scary previews and everyone is welcome. If you’re interested in checking these out, here’s a link to the Sensory Friendly Films. As they use to say in the old(er) days, it’s fun for the whole family.

Sincerely-

  

Autism Librarian

Sheltered workshop update

So as this article states, the clock is ticking on Ohio to make some changes by 2019. Now I know I’ve posted before on how changes are needed for shelter workshops. I talk to one parent who said they pay like three or four dollars an hour, almost have what people who don’t have a disability get paid.

Since my son is still not there yet, I forget what those and their families have to be worried about when and/or if the changes happen in Ohio, here in Missouri and elsewhere. This article, entitled “Changes Looming For Sheltered Workshops” by Alan Johnson over at Disability Scoop really brought that home.

Sincerely-

  

Autism Librarian

Today was a good day

Today was a good day in my world with autism and so I thought I would share a story of my own rather than an article.  It so happens my son told me a couple of weeks ago that he was getting a F in biology, which I promptly forgot but then yesterday he told me he was now getting a D.

The strangest part was he told me what his percentage was each time. The F was a 57% and the D was 63%. He said he saw the grade online. That in and of itself, made me a little suspicious.

So this time I remembered to e-mail his teacher to find out if this is true and if so, how come I never heard from the school. Turns out he has an A (97%) and in fact, the highest grade in the class. I do love my son.

Sincerely-

  

Autism Librarian