Siblings

As the father of a now young man with autism, one who has graduated from high school, I believe I know at least some parts of his future. He will outlive both myself and his mom but perhaps not his brother and sister.

Chances are, they will be his caretakers at some point in his life but like everyone else, I cannot predict the future. One thing I am hoping for at some point is for him and his siblings to get along.

At this point, it’s a struggle and that is why when I read this article, it gave me hope that perhaps one day his siblings will write a letter like this to their brother. The article is entitled “It is an Honor to Have You as My Brother” over at Autism Speaks. I hope they will.

Sincerely-

   

Autism Librarian

My sons future

Tonight I don’t really have an article but I just wanted to given an update on what I’ve been doing for my son. So last week I went to a Family Transition Support Group meeting over at St. Louis ARC and asked them about the ability of individuals to open up their own Special Needs Trust and they said she wasn’t aware of that.

Then tonight I first e-mailed my state treasurer to see what the status is regarding ABLE accounts here in Missouri and then e-mailed the Special School District here in St.Louis County to set up an appointment to talk some more about the options my son will have after he graduates this spring.

My next step is to look over the workshops for this semester and take or re-take any I feel I need too. For some strange reason when I went to that meeting last week, I felt sort of like I have a plan.

On a side note though, I recently wrote a post on the idea of building a tiny house for my son and I learned at the aforementioned meeting that Autism Speaks recently did some research on them. I printed something up the other day and I still need to read about that. There’s always something!

Sincerely-

   

Autism Librarian

Autism is beautiful

I know from where this mother writes. I’ve been there a thousand times and will visit there again a thousand times more. I recently wrote about how Autism Speaks has changed their mission and I think this article is a perfect example of that.

The article is entitled “My Sweet Boy, You’re Different by Danielle Duggins over at The Mighty. My son is different too but, that’s what makes the world a beautiful place and like her son, the world will be a better place for his presence in it.

Sincerely-

   

Autism Librarian

 

Shopping without distractions

Honestly, there are lots of things I would love to do without distractions. We are so inundated with needless sensory overload. Having gone to a movie without those annoying previews and the lights on with my kids, thanks to our local chapter of Autism Speaks, taught me that years ago.

So when I saw this article entitled “JC Penney Hosts Back-to-School Shopping Event for Shoppers With Autism” over at The Mighty by , I knew they were on to something. I also seem to recall a store in England doing this a while back and thought, when will I see this over on the other side of the pond? Well, I wonder no more.

Sincerely-

  

Autism Librarian

Compliments

Normally I never get compliments on what I’m wearing. That’s probably in part because I buy mostly used clothes. This past Friday however, I was wearing a new t-shirt I got last week (see below) and I got more compliments in a day than I do in a week or more.

tshirtback

Just goes to show you how many people are affected by autism. By the way, what they liked was actually what it said on the front, It’s Time to Listen.

No doubt!

  

Autism Librarian

Change at the top over at Autism Speaks

It seems that the couple who started Autism Speaks ten years ago, are stepping aside at Autism Speaks to allow the next generation to take the reigns. I find it appropriate that Brian Kelly, the new chairman has a 16 year old son on the spectrum.

Like Brian, I have a nearly 16 year old son and so the next challenge for the organization may be to focus on those children diagnosed with autism who are becoming adults. The article is entitled “Autism Speaks Sees Leadership ChangeBy

Thank you Bob and Suzanne!

  

Autism Librarian

What we really want to know about autism

I came across this podcast tonight and I found it very interesting. It seems that there is some disparity between what researchers are focused on and what the autism community wants funded.

This month’s Autism Matters Podcast Series at Autism Speaks features “Liz Pellicano, director of London’s Centre for Research in Autism and Education“. She talks discusses that and more.

Enjoy!

 

Autism Librarian

 

The eyes have it

When I found this article from Autism Speaks in my inbox today, I thought great. Here’s some research perhaps getting us a little closer to helping those with autism. As I watched the video however, I remembered back to another article I recently posted.

In that article, The Kids Who Beat Autism there was a gentleman from the Autistic Self Advocacy Network who was quoted as saying “Autism isn’t an illness in need of a cure” and somehow this video got me to thinking about that statement.

I know my son wouldn’t be who he is if he wasn’t autistic and while I would love for him to be able to get through a day without the anxiety he feels or the behavior impediments that he has, I also know autism is part of his makeup.

Just food for thought. The article is entitled “Resilience from Autism: Study Shows Some Babies Undergo Course Correction” at Autism Speaks.

 

Autism Librarian

Looking towards the future

So today I started looking at how to create a living trust for my son. I’ve attended at least one webinar on the topic and I think I need to do that again but unfortunately that probably won’t happen until the fall. Later I tried to call his school up to check on his schedule for the fall with no luck.

So then tonight I saw this, something called a Community-based Skills Assessment (CSA): Developing a Personalized Transition Plan. It’s a tool that over on the Autism Speak website. Some days, it just seems so overwhelming. Today was one of those days.

Sincerely-

 

Autism Librarian