Family time

Minnesota

So for the end of July and early August , this is where I was, northern Minnesota or what I like to call heaven. It seems like every sunset we see up there is different. This year though, we also went up to Winnipeg, Canada and I must say we had a great time up there too. Unfortunately I don’t have any pictures of our time there. I’ll have to ask my daughter if she has any. I was busy just enjoying the moments.

Sincerely-

   

Autism Librarian

Just one of those days

Today I don’t have a particular article to post just my thoughts. So my son graduated from high school this year and while he has a work/study program lined up for the next three years if necessary with the St. Louis Special School District, I have a lot to do.

I need to deposit some money into his new ABLE account, I need to get him over to a friend’s automobile shop to work on seeing if he’s interested in becoming a mechanic and at the same time, check out the local community colleges technician’s program. Then there’s the whole Supported Decision Making thing to look at and the list goes on….

With out vacation coming up, I need to try and get some of this done before we leave because once we get back, school for his siblings as well as his work/study program will be close to beginning. So much to do and so little time.

Sincerely-

   

Autism Librarian

Back in the day

So this article about a letter from a mother to her autistic son doesn’t necessarily relate to me in regards to their relationship, it does take me back. In fact I just realized tonight I’ve been writing this blog for nearly ten years now.

At the time, my son and I were early on in our journey. So in honor of those ten years and for all mothers and fathers of sons or daughters with autism, this letter is for you. It’s entitled “A Letter to my Son with Autism” by Kristen Williams over at The Mighty. We should all write a letter to our child.

Sincerely-

  
  
Autism Librarian

Siblings

As the father of a now young man with autism, one who has graduated from high school, I believe I know at least some parts of his future. He will outlive both myself and his mom but perhaps not his brother and sister.

Chances are, they will be his caretakers at some point in his life but like everyone else, I cannot predict the future. One thing I am hoping for at some point is for him and his siblings to get along.

At this point, it’s a struggle and that is why when I read this article, it gave me hope that perhaps one day his siblings will write a letter like this to their brother. The article is entitled “It is an Honor to Have You as My Brother” over at Autism Speaks. I hope they will.

Sincerely-

   

Autism Librarian

Reminiscing

So the article I’m posting today is about a place I’m familiar with. It’s entitled “When the ‘Basics’ Are Difficult for My Son with Autism” by Shawna Wingert over at The Mighty. While my son doesn’t know what a CPU is, his knowledge of cars is incredible.

In fact, a few weeks ago I took him to a friends mechanic shop, with the idea that if he knows a lot about cars from the outside, maybe learning about the inside of cars is the next logical step.

Anyway, like the young man in the article, my son couldn’t do the basics at that age but to look at him today, it’s amazing to see how far he’s come. As Ms. Wingert said in her article, my son will figure it out. Until then, he has me. I’m his dad.

Sincerely-

   

Autism Librarian

The next stage

So a week ago my son turned eighteen. This past Saturday he graduated from high school. I have to say, that while I am extremely proud of him, it hit me pretty hard.

I shed a few tears as I sat there, then a few more as I shared the story with friends & family and today, I shed quite a few more when I red this article entitled “Struggling to Find My Role After Placing my Son with Autism in Residential Care” by Kristen Scott over at The Mighty.

While it’s not my story, it’s perhaps a glimpse into the next stage of my relationship with my son. Fortunately I still have a little while before we get there.

Sincerely-

   

Autism Librarian

 

Lens for love

So tonight I’m going to talk about a website that I just came upon called Lenses for Love and the incredible work that it does. I was actually inspired enough by the story I read recently that I applied to be a photographer. I was so inspired that I did this without having a good enough camera to do the job. I am planning however, to get one over the summer. So meanwhile I will wait and see.

Sincerely-

   

Autism Librarian

Looking in the mirror

So the kids and I were watching what are known locally as the Musial Awards. They recognize remarkable individuals and amazing stories of character, kindness, selflessness and integrity in sports.

Anyway, they had one story on college football player Travis Rudolph and how sitting down to have lunch with an autistic young man named Bo Paske at his school became a story that went viral.

During the story, his mom talked about when her son was diagnosed with autism and how she was told by the doctor he won’t ever hold a job, play team sports or even live on his own. What many parents of kids with special abilities hear.

Anyway, as she related that fact to the reporter of the story, my son kept looking at me. Sort of like, do you worry about that with me? I didn’t really pursue the discussion. I guess I just wanted to see if it would sink in with him and leave it for a conversation on another day. One that will come soon enough.

Sincerely-

  

Autism Librarian

Adults with autism

As I read this article tonight and as I struggle to make sure all the supports are in place for my son, for now and for his future, some of what this author says in her article takes me to wondering where my son will be when he is twenty-seven years old.

The article is entitled “When I Say I’m Struggling as an Adult on the Autism Spectrum” by over at The Mighty. I feel like I’m on the right track and it will be from articles like this one that will help to motivate me to make sure my son has as much as I can give him to be ready for the future.

Sincerely-

     

Autism Librarian