Life insurance

So tonight is another one of those nights where I’ve been unable to come up with an article. What I’ve decided to do instead is write what steps I need to help him transition into the next step of his life, now that he is 19 years old and officially out of high school.

For the last couple of weeks, I’ve been looking around (with no success I might add) on information about my life insurance at work and since I finally found something, I decided to go with this topic first.

What I’ll do for the next couple of days is come up with any questions I might have about it regarding my son, like if I died tomorrow, how do I make sure it goes to where he needs it?

Then next week I’ll write about what I’ve learned and make a list of what I need to do to get it all set up. Tomorrow I’ll start with reading what I’ve found and we’ll take it from there. So wish me luck.

Sincerely-

       

Autism Librarian

 

 

 

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On to the next chapter of his story

So tonight’s post is really just a thank you. In a couple of weeks, my son will no longer be in school and soon to be on to the next chapter in the story of his life. Along the way, he’s had lots of support from teachers, teacher aids, volunteers and the like.

Why I can’t begin to thank them all, I would like to start with the one constant teacher he had for all four years in high school, his Special School District teacher and her team. This year is her last year as she is retiring and I can’t begin to thank her enough for how much she helped him grow during those four years.

Thank you!

         

Autism Librarian

 

 

 

Home

This article tonight really hit home for me in the sense that I remember being in that same place and I agree, it’s what many parents of a child with autism don’t want to say out loud, though not just at the age of 13.

The article is entitled “Here is What No One Says Out Loud about Raising a 13-year old Son with Autism” by Carrie Cariello over at Huffington Post. That said, this is how I responded to the post.

As the father of a young man with autism who is now almost 19, I too had doubts if my son would graduate high school. The amazing parts of this journey however, have been when he surprises me, like when he graduated last year and walked with all of his classmates. Where he goes from here is still a mystery but, those amazing parts are what keep me going.

Sincerely-

   

Autism Librarian

Planning for the future

Coming across this article wasn’t exactly the kind of reading I needed to see but, on the other hand, sometimes it’s the kick in the rear you need to keep moving forward. Thankfully I’ve been pushing myself forward a little this week.

The article is entitled “Few Parents Plan for Future of Children with Disabilities, Study Finds” by Courtney Perkes over at Disability Scoops. Now I just need to go back and read the rest of the article. Even though I’ve been pushing myself a little lately, I have more to do.

Sincerely-

   

Autism Librarian

The future

So as the father of a young man who is now out of high school and looking to find what his future might hold, I thought these two articles in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch (my local paper) might be worth reading. The first is entitled “Autism makes life after high school a struggle for the ‘Mayor of Parkway West’ ” by Kristen Taketa. In a way, I’m living this story.

The other one is entitled “UMSL program gives students with intellectual disabilities a college experience ” by Ashley Jost. I’ve actually took my son up to UMSL to learn a little more about the program. Unfortunately, he’s not interested. We’ll have to wait and see if that changes at some point down the road.

Sincerely-

   

Autism Librarian

Just one of those days

Today I don’t have a particular article to post just my thoughts. So my son graduated from high school this year and while he has a work/study program lined up for the next three years if necessary with the St. Louis Special School District, I have a lot to do.

I need to deposit some money into his new ABLE account, I need to get him over to a friend’s automobile shop to work on seeing if he’s interested in becoming a mechanic and at the same time, check out the local community colleges technician’s program. Then there’s the whole Supported Decision Making thing to look at and the list goes on….

With out vacation coming up, I need to try and get some of this done before we leave because once we get back, school for his siblings as well as his work/study program will be close to beginning. So much to do and so little time.

Sincerely-

   

Autism Librarian

Reminiscing

So the article I’m posting today is about a place I’m familiar with. It’s entitled “When the ‘Basics’ Are Difficult for My Son with Autism” by Shawna Wingert over at The Mighty. While my son doesn’t know what a CPU is, his knowledge of cars is incredible.

In fact, a few weeks ago I took him to a friends mechanic shop, with the idea that if he knows a lot about cars from the outside, maybe learning about the inside of cars is the next logical step.

Anyway, like the young man in the article, my son couldn’t do the basics at that age but to look at him today, it’s amazing to see how far he’s come. As Ms. Wingert said in her article, my son will figure it out. Until then, he has me. I’m his dad.

Sincerely-

   

Autism Librarian

My sons future

Tonight I don’t really have an article but I just wanted to given an update on what I’ve been doing for my son. So last week I went to a Family Transition Support Group meeting over at St. Louis ARC and asked them about the ability of individuals to open up their own Special Needs Trust and they said she wasn’t aware of that.

Then tonight I first e-mailed my state treasurer to see what the status is regarding ABLE accounts here in Missouri and then e-mailed the Special School District here in St.Louis County to set up an appointment to talk some more about the options my son will have after he graduates this spring.

My next step is to look over the workshops for this semester and take or re-take any I feel I need too. For some strange reason when I went to that meeting last week, I felt sort of like I have a plan.

On a side note though, I recently wrote a post on the idea of building a tiny house for my son and I learned at the aforementioned meeting that Autism Speaks recently did some research on them. I printed something up the other day and I still need to read about that. There’s always something!

Sincerely-

   

Autism Librarian

Looking in the mirror

So the kids and I were watching what are known locally as the Musial Awards. They recognize remarkable individuals and amazing stories of character, kindness, selflessness and integrity in sports.

Anyway, they had one story on college football player Travis Rudolph and how sitting down to have lunch with an autistic young man named Bo Paske at his school became a story that went viral.

During the story, his mom talked about when her son was diagnosed with autism and how she was told by the doctor he won’t ever hold a job, play team sports or even live on his own. What many parents of kids with special abilities hear.

Anyway, as she related that fact to the reporter of the story, my son kept looking at me. Sort of like, do you worry about that with me? I didn’t really pursue the discussion. I guess I just wanted to see if it would sink in with him and leave it for a conversation on another day. One that will come soon enough.

Sincerely-

  

Autism Librarian

Right up my son’s alley

While these opportunities might be something my son would be interested in, I know it’s a stretch from where he’s at now. About as far as I’ve gotten is identifying some garages we might be able to go to and see if this is something he would be interested in.

This article over at Disability Scoop entitled “Ford Expands Autism Hiring Initiative” by Michelle Diament however, gives me hope for the future. Keeping hope alive is a good thing.

Sincerely-

  

Autism Librarian