Siblings

As the father of a now young man with autism, one who has graduated from high school, I believe I know at least some parts of his future. He will outlive both myself and his mom but perhaps not his brother and sister.

Chances are, they will be his caretakers at some point in his life but like everyone else, I cannot predict the future. One thing I am hoping for at some point is for him and his siblings to get along.

At this point, it’s a struggle and that is why when I read this article, it gave me hope that perhaps one day his siblings will write a letter like this to their brother. The article is entitled “It is an Honor to Have You as My Brother” over at Autism Speaks. I hope they will.

Sincerely-

   

Autism Librarian

Just an observation

As I said before, it’s my oldest who is autistic but sometimes I see pieces of him in his siblings. The latest piece was when my daughter said she would rather go to see a movie at the movie theater with the lights on like we use to do.

When my son was younger, we use to go to the ones put on by Autism Speaks where the lights are on, there are no ads and the volume can be adjusted. There we would see all types of kids with autism.

You see, last week they went to see latest Star Wars with their mom but since I haven’t seen it yet, she (and her brothers) offered to go with me to see it this weekend with Autism Speaks. Speaks volumes if you ask me.

Sincerely-

  

Autism Librarian

Autism is life

I’ll be first to say I never thought that autism would play a role in my life. Now when I look back, I can’t imagine my life without it.

My daughter loves horses and now she volunteers as a barn buddy with a group called Equine-Assisted Therapy at Longview Farm Park. They work with kids who have special abilities such as autism.

Tonight I found out from my son that he just started reading a series of books whose titles all start with Al Capone by Gennifer Choldenko. The main character, is a twelve year old named Moose (go figure) that has a sister who is autistic. It’s a small world after all.

Sincerely-

  

Autism Librarian

Autism dad

I came across this article this afternoon over at Huffington Post and now after reading it, I have to agree. The article is entitled “Why I Call Myself an ‘Autism Mom’” by .

I particularly liked when she said “It matters for the parents who are struggling, who feel lonely, who are misunderstood every single time they speak with doctors and teachers and therapists” and that’s when I decided to entitle this post Autism dad. It is indeed a team effort.

Sincerely-

  

Autism Librarian

Siblings

I recently received a very nice comment on my post from yesterday entitled Autism, Anxiety and Girls and so afterwards, I decided to visit their blog. That visit inspired me to write this post on siblings.

While I myself have no sibling with special abilities, my daughter and youngest son do, their brother. It’s something that at times weighs heavy on my mind, especially when I’m working to put things in place for my son and his future.

So if you’re a sibling, parent, family or even just a friend of someone with special abilities, I highly recommend visiting The Phoebe Effect : what I’ve learnt from a sister on the spectrum. It’s a good resource (and I should know, I’m a librarian) and well worth your time.

Sincerely-
 

 
Autism Librarian

The brain

The brain is an amazing thing. My dad was a professor of psychology and taught for twenty-five years at a local college. He always talked about little we know about the brain. There have been many times when I wished my dad was here and how proud he would have been of my son. It seems twenty years later and we still know so little.

Anyway, this video by Benjamin Utecht has nothing to do with autism but rather about brain injuries. So in honor of my son and to those who know someone with autism or any brain related issue, I hope you enjoy it. I’ve watched it like a hundred times already and cried every time.

I hope one day we will understand how the brain works, at lease in as much in regards to taking care of it and repairing it when necessary. It’s such a precious commodity. Right up there with the heart.

Chow!

 

Autism Librarian