The next stage

So a week ago my son turned eighteen. This past Saturday he graduated from high school. I have to say, that while I am extremely proud of him, it hit me pretty hard.

I shed a few tears as I sat there, then a few more as I shared the story with friends & family and today, I shed quite a few more when I red this article entitled “Struggling to Find My Role After Placing my Son with Autism in Residential Care” by Kristen Scott over at The Mighty.

While it’s not my story, it’s perhaps a glimpse into the next stage of my relationship with my son. Fortunately I still have a little while before we get there.

Sincerely-

   

Autism Librarian

 

ABLE update for Missouri

A while back, just before we went on vacation, I e-mailed my state Senator to find out the latest on ABLE accounts in Missouri. According to his aid, it looks like they’ll be up and running in a nine-state consortium starting this fall. They also sent me a link to the Missouri Treasurers page with more information.

I guess my next step is to come up with a list of questions on my options and then talk to a financial advisor regarding what to do for my son. Among those questions will also be one about life insurance as my place of employment is allowing me to update and/or increase my current plan for now and even after retirement. So much to do.

Sincerely-

  

Autism Librarian

Adulthood

So today I came across this article and while it’s not geared towards those with special abilities, I thought it might work in a way to give me a baseline towards what skills my son should have. Then maybe I can work backwards.

The article is entitled “What skills should everyone have by age 18? If you start off adult life unprepared, it will hold you back by Starre Vartan over at the Mother Nature Network. Just a little food for thought in the process.

Sincerely-

  

Autism Librarian

IEP’s

So today we have my son’s second to last IEP at his school. I must say that by going to several workshops recently including the one entitled Beyond Guardianship: Supported Decision-Making by Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities by Jonathan Martinis (and put on by the Missouri chapter of the AAIDD) was really helpful.

I felt prepared in what to expect for his senior year and transition from school next year. At the same time, I still have a lot to do. Maybe that’s why I’ve been feeling a little down tonight.

Carry on!

  

Autism Librarian

So now what?

So now that I’ve been to the “Beyond Guardianship: Supported Decision-Making by Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities” workshop by Jonathan Martini, what do I do with what I’ve learned?

Well, the first thing I did was e-mail my son’s Special School District or SSD person at school and while I did get some of the answers I was looking for, I also feel like I have more questions to ask. I feel like I have a better idea of what I want his future to look like.

While I’m happy with what he’s accomplished, I feel like there is so much more he can do. It feels good to have knowledge which in turn gives you power. Now I just need to keep doing what I’m doing.

Sincerely-

  

Autism Librarian