Dear Evan Hansen

Now I haven’t seen this play yet and being in the midwest, I’m guessing it won’t be here for a while. I did however see a story on it recently and must say, it sounds like a must see for me.

I also can’t remember where I first saw the story about this play but this review over at the New York Times entitled “Review: In Dear Evan Hansen, a Lonely Teenager, a Viral Lie and a Breakout Star” tells you all you need to know about the play. In fact, it’s a play for anyone with a special ability, which in reality is all of us.

Sincerely-

   

Autism Librarian

 

 

Thank you!

I think in this article, we can all take a page from David’s playbook. I would also suggest that the airlines would do well to point out this story. For that matter, humanity would do well to tell his story.

The article is entitled “Autistic Man Goes into Panic at Airport, then Airline Employee Crouches Down & Whispers in His Ear” by Josh Starling over at InspireMore. As I’ve said before I’m sure, I speak for many parents of children and adults with autism or any special ability for that matter, we need lots more David’s.

Sincerely-

  

Autism Librarian

Life Skills on the road

So tonight is one of those nights I don’t have an article to post but rather a short story to tell. I was in the car with my eighteen year old son. Now he’s graduated from high school, he will be start to participate in the fall, in what’s called a Vocation Skills Program where he will be working (though not earning a paycheck) and also learning life skills for what could be up to three years or until he ages out of the school district.

Anyway, I was taking him to his summer job this morning, where he does get paid, when it suddenly occurred to me I had the opportunity to teach him about how to get to his job. We talked a little about what direction we were going and what road we would need to get to in order for him to get to work. Now while that was all we talked about for a couple of minutes, it was a start.

Tomorrow will do it all over again after I pick him up at his mom’s house and we discuss how to get to our house. One day at a time and one story at a time. I guess the old saying is true, everything is a teachable moment. At least if you keep your eyes open.

Sincerely-

   

Autism Librarian

Television

I’m willing to admit, I don’t watch a lot of television. In part because I don’t really care for much of what’s on tv these days. I did however, see an ad for a new show about a doctor with autism that sounded interesting.

There’s an article about it over at The Mighty entitled “ABC Adds Show About a Doctor with Autism ‘The Good Doctor’ to Fall Primetime Line-up” by Jordan Davidson. I think it’s good to show people that autism doesn’t necessarily have to limit someone’s employment possibilities.

Sincerely-

   

Autism Librarian

Siblings

As the father of a now young man with autism, one who has graduated from high school, I believe I know at least some parts of his future. He will outlive both myself and his mom but perhaps not his brother and sister.

Chances are, they will be his caretakers at some point in his life but like everyone else, I cannot predict the future. One thing I am hoping for at some point is for him and his siblings to get along.

At this point, it’s a struggle and that is why when I read this article, it gave me hope that perhaps one day his siblings will write a letter like this to their brother. The article is entitled “It is an Honor to Have You as My Brother” over at Autism Speaks. I hope they will.

Sincerely-

   

Autism Librarian

Reminiscing

So the article I’m posting today is about a place I’m familiar with. It’s entitled “When the ‘Basics’ Are Difficult for My Son with Autism” by Shawna Wingert over at The Mighty. While my son doesn’t know what a CPU is, his knowledge of cars is incredible.

In fact, a few weeks ago I took him to a friends mechanic shop, with the idea that if he knows a lot about cars from the outside, maybe learning about the inside of cars is the next logical step.

Anyway, like the young man in the article, my son couldn’t do the basics at that age but to look at him today, it’s amazing to see how far he’s come. As Ms. Wingert said in her article, my son will figure it out. Until then, he has me. I’m his dad.

Sincerely-

   

Autism Librarian

The next stage

So a week ago my son turned eighteen. This past Saturday he graduated from high school. I have to say, that while I am extremely proud of him, it hit me pretty hard.

I shed a few tears as I sat there, then a few more as I shared the story with friends & family and today, I shed quite a few more when I red this article entitled “Struggling to Find My Role After Placing my Son with Autism in Residential Care” by Kristen Scott over at The Mighty.

While it’s not my story, it’s perhaps a glimpse into the next stage of my relationship with my son. Fortunately I still have a little while before we get there.

Sincerely-

   

Autism Librarian